Improving Hip Mobility to address Low Back Issues among NBA players

MarcoNunez · August 21, 2020

ABOUT THE COURSE:

Hip function has been proposed to be related to low back pain (LBP) because of the anatomical proximity of the hip and lumbopelvic region. To date, findings have been inconclusive, possibly because the samples studied were heterogeneous. Sub-grouping samples based on characteristics such as activity demand, LBP classification, and sex might clarify research findings.

The first important factor that has received minimal attention in prior studies is the demand of the activity in which subjects participate on the hip and lumbopelvic region. In the current context, demand includes the type of activity, as well as the frequency, duration, and intensity of participation. For example, an activity typically places specific directional demands on different segments for satisfactory performance. Those who play golf, a sport that requires adequate hip-rotation ROM, might be particularly at risk for LBP if their hip rotation is limited. Frequency, duration, and intensity of participation likely interact with the directional demand put on the hip and lumbopelvic region to determine whether hip function is an important contributing factor to LBP.

A second important factor that has not been previously considered in studies of the hip–LBP relationship is the need to classify people with LBP. The rationale for classification is that people with nonspecific LBP are a heterogeneous group, consisting of several smaller homogeneous subgroups. A number of classification systems have been described that use mechanical and pain-related variables to subgroup people with LBP. Data also have emerged over the last 10 years to validate the existence of some of the described subgroups. It is possible that the relationship of hip function and LBP might vary in different subgroups of people with LBP.

A final factor we consider important is the sex distribution of the study sample. Sex differences have been described, including differences in anatomy, hormonal influences, muscle properties, and recruitment patterns. Specific to the spine, sex differences have been found in muscle-related factors and hip–low back movement patterns during gait and reaching activities Such differences between men and women have the potential to contribute to variation in the kinematics, kinetics, and coordination of the hip and lumbopelvic region. Thus, the presence of a relationship between hip function and LBP, as well as the nature of the relationship, might be different for men and women.

For that reason, Marco Nuñez, will helps us how we can improve our Jumping Skills to jump higher and how to land on the best way to avoid injuries.

From Marco Nuñez:

High Performance Athletic Trainer | Sports Medicine Specialist | Sports Scientist | MS in Human Movement | PES CES FMS SFMA FCS |

Over 20 years of experience working in professional sports.

About Instructor

MarcoNunez

11 Courses

High Performance Athletic Trainer | Sports Medicine Specialist | Sports Scientist | MS in Human Movement | PES CES FMS SFMA FCS | Over 20 years of experience working in professional sports. Instagram: @marcoanunez17
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Course Includes

  • 8 Lessons
Open chat